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"Anglo-Saxon Thegn AD 449-1066" von Harrison, Mark
Warrior 5 Author: Mark Harrison Illustrator: Gerry Embleton The collapse of Roman rule in Britain was not so much a sudden catastrophe as a long and drawn-out decline. The 'Celtic' Britons retreated gradually to the highland areas of Wales, Cornwall and the south-west of Scotland. Control of the fertile eastern lowlands was lost to warriors of Germanic origin who migrated from the Continent. These Germanic conquerors have become known to history as the 'Anglo-Saxons'. They were to dominate the lowland zone of Britain until their final defeat at Hastings in 1066. This title gives an insight into the everyday life, equipment, dress, battle tactics and life on campaign of the typical Anglo-Saxon warrior of this period.

15,99 €*

"Armies of Medieval Burgundy 1364-1477" von Michael, Nicolas
Men-at-Arms 144 Author: Nicholas Michael Illustrator: Gerry Embleton King John the Good of France was captured by the English at the battle of Poitiers in 1356; his 14-year-old son Philip fought valiantly by his side until the bitter end, and as soon as he was in a position to do so, King John rewarded his son's courage and devotion by designating him Duke of Burgundy, a title that by chance had just become extinct. Philip was the first of the Valois Dukes of Burgundy and this fascinating text by Nicholas Michael examines the functioning and organisation of the Burgundian armies from the beginning of his reign until the time of the last of the Valois Dukes; Charles the Bold. Contents - Introduction - Organisation - Charles the Bold's Permanent Army - Artillery - The Army in the Field - Arms and Armour - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1983

13,90 €*

"Armies of Medieval Russia 750-1250" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 333 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride In the centuries following the first expeditions down the great rivers of northern Russia by Viking traders and adventurers, the foundations for a new state were laid. Many influences combined in this colourful culture which grew up first around the great cities of Kiev and Novgorod.

12,99 €*

"Armies of the Caliphates 862-1098" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 320 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Graham Turner The 8th century heralded the start of a golden age in the history of the Islamic world. At this time, the Sunni Muslim 'Abbsid Caliphate, with its capital at Baghdad, ruled virtually the entire Islamic world. Islamic military power peaked in the 9th century, but by the end of this golden age in the 11th century, the 'Abbsid Caliphs had little political and virtually no military power. Featuring numerous photographs of artefacts and eight full colour plates by Graham Turner, David Nicolle's book examines the recruitment, organization, weaponry and uniforms of the armies of the Caliphates from 862-1098. Contents: - Introduction - Heartlands and Frontiers - Recruitment - Organisation - Weaponry - Costume and Uniforms - Tactics - Naval Warfare - Africa - Further Reading - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1998

13,90 €*

"Armies of the Crusades" von Wise, Terence:
Men-at-Arms 75 Author: Terence Wise Illustrator: Gerry Embleton In the early crusades men of all ranks from all over Europe took the cross and went to fight Islam as volunteers. Some went out of religious fervour, others to escape the plagues and famine which were rife at the time, still others in search of land or a fortune in loot. Fighting alongside all of these were the armies raised in Outremer, the Holy Land itself. Together they waged a bloody religious war, the participants of which included such forces as the Knights Templar, the Teutonic Knights, and the Byzantine Army. Contents - The Armies of Christendom - The Armies of Islam - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1978

13,90 €*

"Armies of the Ottoman Turks 1300-1774" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 140 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride The birth of the Ottoman state is shrouded in legend. Whatever the truth of its origins, the Ottoman's formed an Empire which almost succeeded in bringing Christian Europe to its knees. During the last decades of the 13th century, the ambitious Osman Bey's tiny mountain state took eight frontier castles plus the Turkish town of Eskisehir. In 1299 Osman seized Yenisehir after working up the Kara Su valley. With this as its first real capital, the Ottoman state emerged into history poised above the fertile shores of the Sea of Marmara. Contents - The Gazi State - The Ottoman Army, 14th to 16th Centuries - The Struggle for Military Reform, 17th to 18th Centuries - Arms, Armour, Fortification and the Fleet - Chronology of Ottoman Conquests and Losses - Campaigns and Battles - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1983

13,90 €*

"Arthur and the Anglo-Saxon Wars" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 154 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride The Arthurian Age; the Celtic Twilight; the Dark Ages; the Birth of England; these are the powerfully romantic names often given to one of the most confused yet vital periods in British history. It is an era upon which rival Celtic and English nationalisms frequently fought. It was also a period of settlement; and of the sword. This absorbing volume by David Nicolle transports us to an England shrouded in mystery and beset by savage conflict; a land which played host to one of the most enduring figures of our history - Arthur. Contents - Introduction - Chronology - The Arthurian Age - Saxon and Celt - Britian and the Vikings - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1984

13,90 €*

"Byzantine Armies AD 1118-1461" von Heath, Ian
Men-at-Arms 287 Author: Ian Heath Illustrator: Angus McBride The Byzantine Empire's disastrous defeat by the Seljuk Turks at Manzikert in 1071 effectively marked the end of what is often described as the 'middle' period of Byzantine history. Thereafter, surrounded on all sides by younger, more vigorous nations, the once all-powerful Empire slipped into a steady decline which, ultimately, was to prove terminal. However, the Empire's demise was anything but peaceful, and, one way or another, for much of the last four centuries of its existence it was to find itself in a state of virtually constant war. This book examines the fascinating history of the Byzantine Empire and its armies from 1118-1461 AD. Contents: - Introduction - Military Chronology - The Byzantine Armed Forces 1118-1453 - 'Soldiers Hired Amongst All Nations' - The End of the Empire - The Empire of Trebizond - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1995

13,90 €*

"El Cid and the Reconquista 1050-1492" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 200 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride The very name El Cid sums up much of the special character of medieval Spanish warfare. It comes from the Arabic al sayyid, master or chieftain, and seems to have been given to Rodrigo de Vivar by his Muslim foes. But was it given in recognition of El Cid's victories against Islam in the 'Reconquista', or because this Castilian nobleman was as content to serve beside the Muslims as to fight them? The story of the Christian conquest of the Iberian peninsula which gave rise to the legend of El Cid, is here examined by David Nicolle, who outlines the history, tactics, arms and armour of the period. Contents: - Introduction - Chronology - Christian Armies 1050-1150 - Taifa and Almoravid Armies - Christian Armies 1150-1300 - Almohades and Andalusians 1120-1270 - 14th Century Christian Armies - The Kingdom of Granada - Siege, Fortification and Firearms - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1988

13,90 €*

"English Longbowman 1330-1515" von Bartlett, Clive
Warrior 11 Author: Clive Bartlett Illustrator: Gerry Embleton The English military ascendancy which lasted from the mid-14th to the early 15th century was founded upon defensive tactics based on the use of the longbow. This weapon, distinctive in that it was used by English forces alone, was probably the most effective missile weapon of the Late Middle Ages: its arrow had the same penetrative ability as a modern day bullet and the bow's rate of fire was not equalled by any weapon used by English forces until the adoption of the Lee Enfield rifle at the beginning of the 20th century. Contents: - Introduction - Recruitment - Service - Earnings - Plunder - Victualling - Unit Formation - Defensive Wear and Weapons - Weapons - Training - Movement and Transport - Medical Services - Beliefs - Bibliography Osprey 64 pages, Paperback, 1995

15,99 €*

"French Armies of the Hundred Years War" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 337 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries were a time of great upheaval for medieval France. In 1328 the Capetian line came to an end. This was the trigger for the Hundred Years War as successive English kings attempted to uphold their claim to the French throne. Catastrophic defeats at Crcy and Poitiers shook the French kingdom to its core. A period of respite followed under Bertrand du Guesclin, but an even more devastating assault was to follow, under the warrior-king par excellence Henry V, and the French disintegration continued until 1429. This book details how the French began a recovery, partly triggered by the young visionary Joan of Arc, that would end with them as the major European military power. Contents: - Background & Overview - Chronology - Recruitment - Organisation - Equipment - Tactics - Naval aspects - Further Reading - Eight full colour plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 2000

13,90 €*

"French Medieval Armies 1000-1300" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 231 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride By the 11th century the French King had lost control of border regions, while local warfare had grown alarmingly frequent. In fact the energies of the French military lite were now focused on petty internal squabbles and external adventures like the Norman conquest of England. Nevertheless, the population and economy both expanded, although it was not until the 12th century that the crown rebuilt its power-base. Despite its slow start when compared with neighbours like England, the Kingdom of France had, by the 13th century, risen to become the most powerful state in Western Europe. This title describes the organisation, history and tactics of French medieval armies. Contents: - Introduction - The Armies of Northern France - The Armies of Southern France - Strategy and Tactics - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1991

13,90 €*

"German Medieval Armies 1000-1300" von Gravett, Christopher
Men-at-Arms 310 Author: Christopher Gravett Illustrator: Graham Turner In medieval Germany violence was accepted far more than in other kingdoms. Kings were recognised as guardians of order, but this had its limitations. Lords expected to use force to secure their rights or win an argument when peaceful methods were not sufficient. Christopher Gravett does a fine job of examining the organisation and campaigns of German medieval armies from 1000-1300, in a volume containing plenty of photographs and illustrations, including eight full page colour plates by Graham Turner. Contents: - Background - Chronological Table - Organisation - The Ministeriales - The Teutonic Knights - Campaigns - Further Reading - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1997

13,90 €*

"German Medieval Armies 1300-1500" von Gravett, Christopher
Men-at-Arms 166 Author: Christopher Gravett Illustrator: Angus McBride The German rulers were forceful and powerful men, and, surrounded by potential enemies, circumstances dictated the necessity of rule by strength based on military capacity. In the later 15th century, three houses rose above the others; the families of Wittelsbach, Luxemburg and the powerful Austrian Hapsburgs. The struggles of these and other houses, and of the knights and towns, were to be a feature of German history throughout the Middle Ages. This title details the dress, weapons, heraldry and insignia of these prolific forces. Contents - Introduction - Organisation - Campaigns - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1985

13,90 €*

"Hungary and the fall of Eastern Europe 1000-156" von Nicolle,
Men-at-Arms 195 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride Although not widely studied in the West, the medieval history of south-eastern Europe is both fascinating and complex. The Kingdom of Hungary was a vast realm, at least the size of France, that endured throughout the Middle Ages whilst the Byzantine Empire was even more extensive and enduring. The Serbians won themselves a brief but extensive local empire in the 14th century; while the Bulgarians established an effective and cultured state. Other players in the confusing Balkan scene included the Albanians; Wallachians; Moldavians; Transylvanians; Croatians and many others. How did they organise their armies and fight their wars; and why did they ultimately fail? This title answers these questions ably supported by numerous illustrations and eight colour plates. Contents: - Introduction - Chronology - Hungary - Byzantium - Bulgaria - Serbia - Albania - Romania - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1988

13,90 €*

"Imperial Chinese Armies (2) "von Peers, CJ
Men-at-Arms 295 Author: CJ Peers Illustrator: Michael Perry By AD 589, when Yang Chien established himself at the head of a newly reformed Chinese empire, nearly four centuries had elapsed since the fall of the last great imperial dynasty: the Han. Although Yang's new Sui regime consciously modelled itself on its great predecessor, both China and the world outside had changed. The problem for the Sui and their successors was no longer simply to 'overawe the barbarians', but to deal as equals with other cultures that were just as proud and self-confident as their own. Chris Peers examines the imperial armies of China from 590-1260 AD, covering their history, organisation and tactics. Contents: - Introduction - Chronology - The Sui Dynasty, AD 589-618 - The T'ang, 618-907 - Sui and T'ang Armies - The Five Dynasties and the Ten Kingdoms, 907-959 - The Sung Dynasty, 960-1279 - Sung Armies - The Liao, 907-1125 - The His Hsia, 1038-1227 - The Kin Dynasty, 1125-1235 - Military Science and Technology - Nine Important Battles - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1996

13,90 €*

"Italian Medieval Armies 1300-1500" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 136 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Gerry Embleton Mercenaries were a common feature throughout most of Europe in the 14th and 15th centuries, and had been known far earlier. But nowhere did such a sophisticated system of hiring, payment and organisation of mercenaries develop as it did in Italy. The condottiere - whose name came from the condotta or contract between himself and his employer - was the result. Whether commander or humble trooper, the condottiere was a complete professional. His skill has never been doubted, but his loyalty and dedication to a particular cause often has. David Nicolle provides a fascinating exploration of the condottiere; his roles, arms and equipment. Contents - Introduction - Medieval Mercenaries - The Great Captains - State Armies - 'Good War'-'Bad War' - Campaigns - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1983

13,90 €*

"Italian Militiaman 1260-1392" von Nicolle, David
Warrior 25 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Christa Hook Medieval Italy was characterized by regular warfare among its numerous city-states, as well as internal strife within comunes as aristocratic factions fought each other for domination of the cities' governments. In this context, Italian warfare developed quickly, with the crossbow playing a key role in improving the armour technology of the Italian city militias that used them. This book traces the evolution of the Italian militiaman, providing a comprehensive view of all aspects of the late medieval Italian city militias, from the weaponry, attitudes and social backgrounds of their members, to the political context that made such formations necessary. CContents: - Italy - A European Anomaly - Chronology - The Crossbow - From Militiaman To Professional - Home And Work - Origins and Recruitment - Pay And Motivation - Tactics And Training - On Campaign - Battle And Aftermath - Arms Manufacture, Trade And Purchase - Dress Weapons And Armour - Collections - Bibliography - Glossary Osprey 64 pages, Paperback, 1999

15,99 €*

"Knight of Outremer AD 1187-1344" von Nicolle, David
Warrior 18 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Christa Hook After Saladin's great victory at the Battle of Hattin in 1137, Outremer, as medieval westerners called the remaining Latin or Catholic enclaves in the eastern Mediterranean, was no longer a threat to Islam. Its military elites preferred to live in peace, focusing on trade as much as on the defence of Christendom's holy places. In this, the first book in the English language to objectively study the knights of the Latin East, David Nicolle presents a well-balanced and informed account of the Western warriors who defended the Crusader territories for so long. Editor's comment This text was originally printed as an article and refers to Saracen Faris 1050-1250 AD (Warrior 10) as well as to this book. Being asked to choose your favourite title from the Osprey list is like being asked which of your children is your favourite - an impossible decision to make. Consequently, I have cheated and selected two books. I have had a personal fascination with the phenomenon of the Crusades since my days at university. Often one of the difficulties of the study of history is to translate dry facts and figures into human terms. It can be almost impossible to fully understand the significance of past events, or certainly to see them in their true context without some idea of the attitudes and philosophies that motivated the people of the period. One of the unique strengths of the Osprey Warrior Series is its ability to take the reader 'under the skin' of its subjects and, at least to some extent, to allow one to see through their eyes, not reflected in the distorted mirror of hindsight. I think both the books I have chosen achieve this aim admirably. Islamic history, society and culture have for centuries been tragically and even wilfully misunderstood by western Europeans. Saracen Faris AD 1050-1250, David Nicolle's study of the mounted Islamic warriors during the Crusades, reveals a civilised and cultured society, more advanced in science and medicine than its European contemporaries. He examines in great detail the weapons, armour and equipment used by the Saracens on a day to day basis - including the intricate construction of the composite bow. The Latin or Catholic Christian population of the Outremer (literally 'the land over the sea') saw their Islamic neighbours in a different light to the more fanatical western Europeans. In Knight of Outremer 1187-1344 AD, David Nicolle brings to life a people for whom the Holy Land was not some abstract concept to be defended, but their home. After the disastrous defeat at Hattin in 1187 the knights no longer represented a threat to Islam and their military lite preferred to live in peace, focusing on trade as much as on the defence of Christendom's holy places. In the Outremer, warfare was seen as a business where victory meant profit and defeat loss. The idea that medieval warfare relied on individual prowess with little or no planning is revealed as nonsense. It was a science whose successful prosecution required sophisticated skills as Dr. Nicolle reveals. These are but a few of the fallacies revealed in the pages of these books and I hope you find both volumes as fascinating as I still do. Lee Johnson, Campaign Series Editor Lee studied Medieval and Early Modern History at University, having caught the history 'bug' from his father at a young age. He was 'recruited' by the architect of the Osprey military list of books, Martin Windrow, joining Osprey in November 1989. Until June 2000 he was Managing Editor of the Military List, when he took the freelance plunge and now works for Osprey commissioning and editing the Campaign Series. Contents: - Introduction - Chronology - Outremer - The Knight in Outremer - Education and Training - Society and Culture - On Campaign - Arms and Armour - Display and Heraldry - Collections - Bibliography - Glossary Osprey 64 pages, Paperback, 1996

15,99 €*

"Knights of Christ" von Wise, Terence
Men-at-Arms 155 Author: Terence Wise Illustrator: Richard Scollins The ancient warrior code which persisted in medieval Christian Europe dictated that a man's greatest virtues were physical strength, skill at arms, bravery, daring, loyalty to the chieftain and solidarity within the tribe. The primitive Church had been diametrically opposed to such ideals, however by the early 8th century the Church had grown wealthy, and the Saracen invasions of Spain and France posed a threat to that wealth. The Roman Church began to support war in defence of the faith, and by channelling the martial spirit into the service of God, the brutal warrior of the past was transformed into a guardian of society. Contents - The Church Militant - Military Orders in the Holy Land - The German Orders - Spanish Military Orders - The Italians Orders - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1984

13,90 €*

"Norman Knight AD 950-1204"von Gravett, Christopher
Warrior 1 Author: Christopher Gravett Illustrator: Christa Hook Throughout the 11th and 12th centuries the Norman knight was possibly the most feared warrior in Western Europe. He was descended originally from the Vikings who had settled in Northern France under their leader Rollo in or around 911 at the behest of Charles the Simple and throughout the following centuries they remembered and built on their warlike reputation. This book shows how their military prowess was renowned throughout the known world and resulted in Normans conquering Sicily in 1060 and England in 1066, as well as participating in many important battles in Italy and playing a major part in the First Crusade. Contents: - Historical Background - Chronology - Appearance and Equipment - Construction and Repair - Training - Tactics - Typical Engagements - Motivation - Bohemond - Logistics - Museums - Glossary Osprey 64 pages, Paperback, 1993

15,99 €*

"Saladin and the Saracens" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 171 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride Salah al Din Yusif ibn Ayyub, known to his Muslim contemporaries as al Nasi, 'The Victorious', and to an admiring Europe as Saladin, is the most famous single figure in the history of the Crusades, being even better known outside the English-speaking world than his Christian foe Richard the Lionheart. Traditionally portrayed as a quiet, deeply religious and even humble man, Saladin was a typical product of his day and his culture. This title shows how the societies and military systems that he and his successors led from defeat to eventual triumph were far more sophisticated than is generally realised, and brings vividly to life the history, organisation, arms and armour of Saladin and the Saracens. Contents - Introduction - Saljuqs and Fatimids - Saladin and the Ayyubids - Disaster and Triumph - Arms and Armour - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1986

13,90 €*

"Saracen Faris AD 1050-1250" von Nicolle, David
Warrior 10 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Christa Hook In the Middle East, not only were the 12th and 13th centuries punctuated by European Crusades but, even more significantly, the mid-11th century saw the invasion of the Saljuq Turks and the mid-13th century witnessed a devastating Mongol assault. Crucial to the Middle Eastern forces involved was the professional cavalryman, known as a faris or 'horseman'. A faris' training was far more wide-ranging than that of a contemporary European knight, including the use of horse-archery and the ability to fight on foot as well as general horsemanship and the use of the lance and sword. David Nicolle's text presents a detailed view of these fascinating and versatile warriors. Editor's comment This text was originally printed as an article and refers to Knight of Outremer 1187-1344AD (Warrior 18) as well as to this book. Being asked to choose your favourite title from the Osprey list is like being asked which of your children is your favourite - an impossible decision to make. Consequently, I have cheated and selected two books. I have had a personal fascination with the phenomenon of the Crusades since my days at university. Often one of the difficulties of the study of history is to translate dry facts and figures into human terms. It can be almost impossible to fully understand the significance of past events, or certainly to see them in their true context without some idea of the attitudes and philosophies that motivated the people of the period. One of the unique strengths of the Osprey Warrior Series is its ability to take the reader 'under the skin' of its subjects and, at least to some extent, to allow one to see through their eyes, not reflected in the distorted mirror of hindsight. I think both the books I have chosen achieve this aim admirably. Islamic history, society and culture have for centuries been tragically and even wilfully misunderstood by western Europeans. Saracen Faris AD 1050-1250, David Nicolle's study of the mounted Islamic warriors during the Crusades, reveals a civilised and cultured society, more advanced in science and medicine than its European contemporaries. He examines in great detail the weapons, armour and equipment used by the Saracens on a day to day basis - including the intricate construction of the composite bow. The Latin or Catholic Christian population of the Outremer (literally 'the land over the sea') saw their Islamic neighbours in a different light to the more fanatical western Europeans. In Knight of Outremer 1187-1344 AD, David Nicolle brings to life a people for whom the Holy Land was not some abstract concept to be defended, but their home. After the disastrous defeat at Hattin in 1187 the knights no longer represented a threat to Islam and their military lite preferred to live in peace, focusing on trade as much as on the defence of Christendom's holy places. In the Outremer, warfare was seen as a business where victory meant profit and defeat loss. The idea that medieval warfare relied on individual prowess with little or no planning is revealed as nonsense. It was a science whose successful prosecution required sophisticated skills as Dr. Nicolle reveals. Lee Johnson, Campaign Series Editor Lee studied Medieval and Early Modern History at University, having caught the history 'bug' from his father at a young age. He was 'recruited' by the architect of the Osprey military list of books, Martin Windrow, joining Osprey in November 1989. Until June 2000 he was Managing Editor of the Military List, when he took the freelance plunge and now works for Osprey commissioning and editing the Campaign Series. Contents: - Introduction - Chronology - Origins and Recruitment - Training - Home and Barracks - Military Careers - On Campaign - Arms and Armour Osprey 64 pages, Paperback, 1994

15,99 €*

"The Age of Tamerlane" von Nicolle, David
Men-at-Arms 222 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride Tamerlane or Timur-i-Lenk ('Timur the Lame') is one of the most extraordinary conquerors in history. In the late 14th century his armies seized huge territories from the borders of Mongolia to Palestine and Anatolia. His passage was marked by massacres that outdid even those of the Mongols for sheer savagery. Timur's career was unequalled since Alexander the Great in terms of constant battlefield success. Only in his youth, while recovering his family estates south of Samarqand, did he face occasional defeat. This title tells the remarkable story of Timur and details the organisation, tactics, arms and armour of his all-conquering army. Contents: - The Lame Conqueror - Timur's World - Timur's Army - Strategy, Tactics and Seige Warfare - The Later Timurids - Foes of the Timurids - Arms and Armour - The Plates Osprey 48 pages, Paperback, 1990

13,90 €*